Our Trees

Fraser Fir

Fraser firs have strong branches which turn upward giving a compact appearance. There needles are a flattened, dark-green with a groove on the upper side, and a silvery-white coloring on underside. The bark is usually a gray to gray-brown color, in the younger trees the are many resin blisters and as it becomes older it becomes more papery like scales.

The needle retention, and dark blue-green color along with plesant scent and easy transport makes fraser fir trees one of the most popular Christmas trees. On average it takes 7 to 10 years for tree growers to produce a 6 to 7 foot tree.

Fraser Fir trees are priced at approximately seven dollars per foot. If you are interested in a tree taller than eight feet, be sure to get out to the farm as soon as possible because these tend to sell early in the season.


Scotch Pine

The Scotch Pine is a species native to Europe and Asia introduced by early European settlers. It is extremely hardy and is adaptable to a wide variety of soils and sites. The needles are between one inch and three inches in length.

The Scotch Pine is known for its dark green foliage and stiff branches - well suited for decoating with lights as well as light and heavy ornaments. It is also known for retaining its needles during harvest, shipping, and display, making it one of the most popular choices for Christmas trees.

If watered regularly, the Scotch Pine will remain fresh for three to four weeks.

Scotch Pine trees are priced at approximately three to four dollars per foot.


Canaan Fir

The Canaan Fir is a relative newcomer to the Christmas tree market. It is very similar to the Fraser Fir. The Canaan Firs used for seedling production are made in a small area in West Virginia but trees of this type exist naturally in other areas.

Canaan Fir trees are priced at approximately seven dollars per foot.


White Pine

Beginning with the British colonists, the white pine has proven to be one of the most important and most desirable species of North America. The white pine is considered to be the largest pine in the United States. Needles are soft, flexible and bluish-green to silver green in color and are regularly arranged in bundles of five. Needles are 2.5 to 5 inches in length. It is found on many different sites including dry rocky ridges and wet sphagnum bogs, but best development is on moist sandy loam soils. Needle retention is good to excellent. White pine has very little aroma, but, conversely, is reported to result in fewer allergic reactions than do some of the more aromatic species.

White Pine trees are priced at approximately three to four dollars per foot.